Another Translation Poll!

Okay, guys, once again, which of these translations below do you think is the most natural sounding English?

A) God chose what is low and despised in the world, even things that are not, to bring to nothing things that are

B) He chose what the world looks down on and despises, and thinks is nothing, in order to destroy what the world thinks is important.

C) God has chosen the world’s insignificant and despised things—the things viewed as nothing—so He might bring to nothing the things that are viewed as something,

D) And God chose what is insignificant in the world, what is despised, what is nothing, in order to destroy what is something

E) God chose what is low and despised in the world, what is regarded as nothing, to set aside what is regarded as something

F) and the base things of the world and the despised, God has chosen, the things that are not, that He might nullify the things that are

G) God chose the lowly things of this world and the despised things—and the things that are not—to nullify the things that are,

Vote in the comments!

16 thoughts on “Another Translation Poll!

Add yours

  1. By process of elimination…

    I dislike the use of something at the end so that leaves ABFG. I also dislike the use of hyphens in C & G (what is the point?) so that leaves ABF. When reading for comprehension both A & F are confusing so that leaves B. It also appears that B is the only option that doesn’t use a form of thing/something in the last phrase. It may be that without it’s context I prefer the option that makes the most sense as an individual verse. Anyways, I choose:

    B

  2. Its interesting to read your opinion. I didn’t even think about the punctuation issue you raised—but then, I do that sometimes myself.

    Other than that, you’ve found the exact same things that irritate me!

    By the way, the hyphen is actually a dash. hyphens are used to separate parts of a word: in-com-plete-ness. The dash is used for interrupting a thought—like I am right now—in order to convey an important detail of some kind—or to add some kind of detail to the end of a statement.

  3. Okay, Mike:

    When you say “Okay, guys,” you mean in your natural English “not only guys but also gals,” right?

    Otherwise, I’m also just voting H (as in the thing in tomato, or in the very next best translation choice).

  4. I use the word “guys” in the same sense that Texans use “ya’ll.” In fact I can think of an instance in our youth group recently where I addressed a small group of teenage girls with “Hey guys…” To my knowledge I don’t ever use the word “gals.”

  5. Sorry for the misunderstanding yall.

    My ballot, then, goes for B if I can’t choose “God’s Word”:

    B: He chose what the world looks down on and despises, and thinks is nothing, in order to destroy what the world thinks is important.

    (GW: God chose what the world considers ordinary and what it despises-what it considers to be nothing-in order to destroy what it considers to be something.

    and doesn’t Paul’s syntax make for similar kinds of word play?)

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