Grammatical description necessarily involves a minimum of two languages. There is, first, the object language, the language being […]

In Part I, we tried to give a basic overview of what aspect is, along with one practical application for paying attention to aspect. In Part II, we considered some of the various points of agreement and disagreement among scholars on this topic. With this background, we are in a better place to discuss perfect aspect. Part III provides a condensation of parts of my chapter on the perfect in Black & Merkle (2020).

There is effectively no debate about the definition of aspect in Greek. There is also effectively no debate about the definitions of the imperfective and perfective aspects, two categories we discussed in Part I. This is true whether you’re reading Fanning (1990), Decker (2007), Campbell (2007), any of the contributors to Runge & Fresch (2016), or anyone else.