Genitives and 2nd position adjectives

This is another question that was asked online (this time New Testament Greek Club) that would be difficult to answer without treebanks. Can a phrase with an adjective in second attributive position be broken up by a genitive? Luke 23:35 reads: εἰ οὗτός ἐστιν ὁ χριστὸς τοῦ θεοῦ ὁ ἐκλεκτός. Can this be, "if he is... Continue Reading →

Prepositional phrases with indefinite NP’s

The question was asked on Facebook about what principles might motivate the occurrence of indefinite noun phrases to take prepositional phrases. It's a good question. Prepositions phrases tend be restrictive when they occur in noun phrases just like other NP modifiers. But they certainly can still be descriptive, too. I ran a quick and dirty... Continue Reading →

A brief history of syntactic theory: Early Chomsky

This is part one of a multi-part series. Part II is: A brief history of syntactic theory: Parallel-contraint based syntax. τυφωθείς εἰς κρίμα ἐμπέσῃ τοῦ διαβόλου What is the structure of a sentence like this? There's a lot going on here. This clause has a pre-verbal participle, followed by a prepositional phrase that is split in... Continue Reading →

ἘΚ and ἈΠΌ in the Early Roman Koine.

Both contributors to this blog (yes, there actually is more than one --- Mike and Rachel Aubrey) are contributing to the Greek Prepositions Workshop at Tyndale House, Cambridge this coming summer. We're co-authoring two papers. We will be doing an examination of the semantics of ἐκ and ἀπό, the emphasis on how their usage has... Continue Reading →

I could have sworn that I had mentioned Lars Nordgren's book, Greek Interjections Syntax, Semantics and Pragmatics at some point before, but apparently not. I can't find the post. In any case, his book received a detailed review in the latest issue of the Bryn Mawr Classical Review by Coulter George: Lars Nordgren, Greek Interjections:... Continue Reading →

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