Book notes: Paul’s Triumph

Paul's Triumph: Reassessing 2 Corinthians 2:14 in Its Literary and Historical Context by Christoph Heilig. Don't let the title fool you. While it appears to be a relatively standard New Testament studies monograph (and there's nothing wrong with that), this book is also of great interest to Greek linguists as well, focusing primarily on the... Continue Reading →

There is a lot of significant work on Ancient Greek that came out in the 19th century. Some of it was by native Greek speakers. The challenge is that during that period, the politics of language in Greece was a source of constant debate and argument. Many times the ancient language was used as a... Continue Reading →

The myth of the synchronic-diachronic dichotomy

The overarching dialectic treated in this work is framed in terms of the familiar ‘synchronic-diachronic’ opposition indicative of 20th century linguistic dualism. Taken as a strict dichotomy, synchrony and diachrony are, ipso facto, irreconcilable. If we distance ourselves from the old essentialist presuppositions and approach the actual unfolding of language use and linguistic cognition in... Continue Reading →

Robert Crellin's Ph.D. dissertation is now available in monograph form at an incredibly reasonable price (retail of $40, currently $33 on Amazon) in the Publications of the Philological Society Series. The syntax and semantics of the perfect active in literary Koine Greek (Amazon) It's an excellent piece of research. He and I have some differences... Continue Reading →

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