Accents matter.

Take the time to learn Greek accents. Just at a basic level of grammar, the nature of Greek propositions is predicated on its accentual system: the move from old/assumed topic to new/asserted focus wholly relies upon accentuation. If you don't learn accents, then you don't learn the basic language internal structure for interpreting and understanding... Continue Reading →

The relevance of typology in grammatical research

Many New Testament scholars look at language typology with suspicion. Some believe that using typological studies is dangerous because they have the potential to mislead the scholar to draw conclusions about Greek grammar not from the internal structure of the language, but instead the structure of other languages. I would like to suggest that is... Continue Reading →

Sapir on grammar and grammars

“The habitual association of radical elements, grammatical elements, words, and sentences with concepts or groups of concepts related into wholes is the fact itself of language. It is important to note that there is in all languages a certain randomness of association. Thus, the idea of “hide” may be also expressed by the word “conceal,”... Continue Reading →

I recently got an e-mail notification that Robert Beekes'* (2010)  Etymological Dictionary of Greek has received quite a dramatic price drop on its Logos.com prepublication page (link). Going from over $500 downs down to a much more comfortable $105. This price change on the part of Logos.com moves their pricing from that of the hardcover edition's $550 (Amzon for... Continue Reading →

Martin Haspelmath has an interesting piece about the intersection between grammar writing and typology on his website, responding to a recent article in the journal Linguistic Typology: Should descriptive grammars be “typologically informed”, and what does this mean? The thrust of the post is probably this quote here: "While the language documenter’s and describer’s work... Continue Reading →

An interview with Rachel Aubrey

Our friends and colleagues at Old School Script have released a new edition of their interview series: Scholars in Press. My wife and occasional contributor here at Koine Greek is the most recent respondent. Scholars in Press: An Interview with Rachel Aubrey Some of the interview highlights for me are: My initial interest in Greek and Hebrew... Continue Reading →

Rijkoff – The Noun Phrase

Jan Rijkoff, linguist/typologist, wrote a superb monograph presenting language variation and typology of the syntax and semantics of noun phrases across a wide variety of languages. The Noun Phrase by Jan Rijkoff (Oxford Studies in Typology and Linguistics)   Offers a new, semantic model of the noun phrase Based on data from a representative sample... Continue Reading →

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