Book notes: Paul’s Triumph

Paul's Triumph: Reassessing 2 Corinthians 2:14 in Its Literary and Historical Context by Christoph Heilig. Don't let the title fool you. While it appears to be a relatively standard New Testament studies monograph (and there's nothing wrong with that), this book is also of great interest to Greek linguists as well, focusing primarily on the... Continue Reading →

Compounds & derivatives

Sometimes looking at how a give noun is used to produce other words in a fascinating exercise. These are all from LSJM, though the glosses are modernized: μάχαιρα - knife/dagger μαχαιρᾶς - knife merchant μαχαιρίδιον - small knife μάχαιριον - shaving blade μαχαιρίς - butcher's knife μαχαιροδέτης - sword belt μαχαιροθήκη - knife case μαχαιροκ[οπέω]... Continue Reading →

The source of SOURCE Expressions: Embodiment

When we talk about prepositional meaning, we have focused on the usage of prepositions in constructional contexts. We have not talked about ἀπό or ἐκ meaning CAUSE, for example, but rather ἀπό and ἐκ being used in a CAUSE expressions. This is an important distinction.

Accents matter.

Take the time to learn Greek accents. Just at a basic level of grammar, the nature of Greek propositions is predicated on its accentual system: the move from old/assumed topic to new/asserted focus wholly relies upon accentuation. If you don't learn accents, then you don't learn the basic language internal structure for interpreting and understanding... Continue Reading →

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