There is a lot of significant work on Ancient Greek that came out in the 19th century. Some of it was by native Greek speakers. The challenge is that during that period, the politics of language in Greece was a source of constant debate and argument. Many times the ancient language was used as a... Continue Reading →

David A. Black, in his Sunday morning blog post (you'll need to scroll for it--April 23, 8:30AM) mused about the possibility of hosting a Greek linguistics conference at Southern Eastern Baptist Theological Seminary. He asked for feedback on the idea and since I was mentioned in the post directly, I thought I should take a moment and provide... Continue Reading →

Martin Haspelmath has an interesting piece about the intersection between grammar writing and typology on his website, responding to a recent article in the journal Linguistic Typology: Should descriptive grammars be “typologically informed”, and what does this mean? The thrust of the post is probably this quote here: "While the language documenter’s and describer’s work... Continue Reading →

A 2016 Retrospective

Looking forward to 2017 means that I am coming up on my tenth year blogging here. That seems like quite an achievement in my practicing of narcissism. Though, in fairness, I never anticipated that I would ever end up with the website that I have built up here over the years. The success of Koine... Continue Reading →

Diachronic Prototype Semantics

I got my hands on this little guy last week: Dirk Geeraerts' Diachronic Prototype Semantics: A Contribution to Historical Lexicography. It's an older volume--1997, but really insightful. Geeraerts knows the field of semantics and lexicology and its history with a depth and degree of thoughtfulness that the vast majority of us can only aspire to... Continue Reading →

There's a detailed review of the Greek Verb Revisited on Amazon. It's exciting to see the positive response the volume is getting. Of course, I disagree with a few of his points across a variety of the chapters (including my own), but that should be unsurprising. It's a big book with plenty of room for discussion. I certainly... Continue Reading →

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