Reduplicative Futures

If you’ve ever encountered some weird looking forms perhaps tagged as perfects perhaps tagged as something else that have reduplication while also having perfective/aoristic morphology, it’s probably thrown you off. For example, in Leviticus 13:45, we have: Καὶ ὁ λεπρός, ἐν ὧ ἐστιν ἡ ἁφή, τὰ ἱμάτια αὐτοῦ ἔστω παραλελυμένα καὶ ἡ κεφαλὴ αὐτοῦ ἀκατακάλυπτος,... Continue Reading →

No Tense Outside the Indicative Mood: Origin?

One claim that you'll regularly encounter once you start reading various contemporary works on the Greek Verb from NT scholars is the idea that Georg Curtius (1873 [English: 1883]) was the originator of the idea that Greek does not grammaticalize tense outside the indicative mood. Con Campbell's recent book, Advances in the Study of Greek, is a... Continue Reading →

Iterative usage of aspect in the imperative mood

When we look at aspectual choice in the indicative mood, we find that there are a number of usage-based factors that influence the speaker/writers decision to prefer the imperfective aspect or the perfective aspect. In narrative, the major driver of aspect choice is, of course, grounding (cf. Hopper 1981), but in non-narrative, that becomes less... Continue Reading →

Aspect, imperatives, and event conceptualization

(Note: if you have the font SBL Greek installed, the Greek will look great. Otherwise…I don’t know.) A couple weeks ago, I noted that the speaker/author's perspectival choices could affect the selection of aspect both in the indicative (see Bentein on Aspectual Perspective) and in the imperative (see Perspectival uses of Aspect in the Imperative).... Continue Reading →

Perspectival uses of Aspect in the Imperative

I mentioned in my previous post about  Klaas Bentein article on academia.edu (Aspectual choice and the presentation of Narrative. An application to Herodotus’ Histories. Glotta 92 [2016]) that Bentein's insight has relevance to the Greek data about aspect in imperatives--if you still haven't examined it, I would encourage you to take a look. It's an... Continue Reading →

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