T. Muraoka’s A Syntax of Septuagint Greek

Out of the kindness of a friend, T. Muraoka's A Syntax of Septuagint Greek (Amazon) arrived at my proverbial doorstep this past week. I've only just begun digging into it. It's both as traditional and innovative as I imagined it would be. In terms of size, the volume has the same dimensions as Muraoka's A Greek-English... Continue Reading →

Reduplicative Futures

If you’ve ever encountered some weird looking forms perhaps tagged as perfects perhaps tagged as something else that have reduplication while also having perfective/aoristic morphology, it’s probably thrown you off. For example, in Leviticus 13:45, we have: Καὶ ὁ λεπρός, ἐν ὧ ἐστιν ἡ ἁφή, τὰ ἱμάτια αὐτοῦ ἔστω παραλελυμένα καὶ ἡ κεφαλὴ αὐτοῦ ἀκατακάλυπτος,... Continue Reading →

No Tense Outside the Indicative Mood: Origin?

One claim that you'll regularly encounter once you start reading various contemporary works on the Greek Verb from NT scholars is the idea that Georg Curtius (1873 [English: 1883]) was the originator of the idea that Greek does not grammaticalize tense outside the indicative mood. Con Campbell's recent book, Advances in the Study of Greek, is a... Continue Reading →

Aspect and imperatives: General vs. specific

“X-rays may not be used to fit shoes.” RCW 70.98.170 Prohibition -- Fluoroscopic x-ray shoefitting devices. The operation or maintenance of any x-ray, fluoroscopic, or other equipment or apparatus employing roentgen rays, in the fitting of shoes or other footwear or in the viewing of bones in the feet is prohibited. This prohibition does not... Continue Reading →

Mark Janse , “Cappadocian Clitics and the Syntax-Morphology Interface”

Mark Janse , “Cappadocian Clitics and the Syntax-Morphology Interface.” Pages 257-281. In Themes in Greek Linguistics II. Edited by Brian D. Joseph, Geoffrey Horrocks, and Irene Philippaki-Warburton. Amsterdam: John Benjamins, 1998. Mark Janse is a descriptive linguist focusing on Greek dialectology with a particular interests in dialectology, non-standard Greek dialects, and Greek historical linguistics. He... Continue Reading →

My Conclusion to “Greek Prohibitions”

Picking up on my obligations for the Greek Verb Conference from last summer, I thought I would post the conclusion to my paper. The full analysis and discussion is going to be in the forthcoming book: The Greek Verb Revisited: A Fresh Approach for Biblical Exegesis. And I'm pretty sure there's going to be a print edition, too,... Continue Reading →

Aspect and imperatives data: The perfect imperative is frustrating

How do you account for the difference between the following? καὶ διεγερθεὶς ἐπετίμησεν τῷ ἀνέμῳ καὶ εἶπεν τῇ θαλάσσῃ· Σιώπα, πεφίμωσο. καὶ ἐκόπασεν ὁ ἄνεμος, καὶ ἐγένετο γαλήνη μεγάλη And he woke up and rebuked the wind and said to the sea: “Be quiet, be silent, and the wind abated and there was a great... Continue Reading →

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