Onward to Cambridge!

I want to again thank everyone who contributed to the GoFundMe Campaign: Cambridge Greek Verb Conference. The response was both astounding and generous. Thank you all so much. Here's what has been happening so far: Rachel and I have been diligently preparing our papers for the conference. We're almost ready! All of you raised enough... Continue Reading →

State predicates and the Greek perfect, Pt 3

This is part three of a three part series. Part one can be found here: State predicates and the Greek perfect, Pt 1 Part two can be found here:  State predicates and the Greek perfect, Pt 2 The assumption an atelic usage of a inherently telic form is wrong finds its origins in what is called the classical model... Continue Reading →

State predicates and the Greek perfect, Pt 2

This is part two of a three part series. Part one can be found here: State predicates and the Greek perfect, Pt 1 Part three will soon be available here on Monday:  State predicates and the Greek perfect, Pt 3 I concluded the previous post with the following statement and in part 2, I want to provide an answer: Fundamentally, the... Continue Reading →

State predicates and the Greek perfect, Pt 1

Somehow this post ended up being 2000 words long. I've broken it into three smaller parts which are scheduled to be posted every other day for the next week. The final project will also be uploaded to Academia.edu as a single PDF for easier access and reference. And just so you know, the 'works cited' list at the end... Continue Reading →

Semantic Gradiance in Middle Lexemes

Transitivity isn't a binary thing. You can scale it across usage. This is clear in things like lexical semantics. Consider the middle instances of φοβέω, for example. ἐφοβήθησαν δὲ ἀκούσαντες ὅτι Ῥωμαῖοί εἰσιν, they grew afraid when they heard they were Roman citizens (Acts 16:38). ἐφοβήθησαν φόβον μέγαν· They were greatly terrified (they feared [with... Continue Reading →

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